Saturday, January 29, 2011

Streets are for people.

Roads are for vehicles. Streets are for people.

These are people who are reclaiming their streets.

- Cairo Street scene. January 2011

No man is an island.

World Streets

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Friday, January 28, 2011

Testimony: Science and Technology Select Committee, UK House of Lords

In the last weeks I was asked to provide written testimony and evidence in answer to a "Call for Evidence" for the UK House of Lords Science and Technology Select Committee on the subject of "Behaviour Change —Travel-Mode Choice Interventions to Reduce Car Use in Towns and Cities". As can happen in these things, in my remarks I moved away from the chosen topic (instruments for behaviour change),  on the grounds that there are other more fundamental issues that need to be tackled first. In the following you will find my submittal of last Monday to the committee, whom I thank for giving me this opportunity to share my views.

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Thursday, January 27, 2011

What is the best way to teach an adult to cycle?

Sustainable transport cannot be separated from sustainable cities. Nor sustainable cities from sustainable lives. Here is a small project from Sweden that takes as its goal to teach people how to balance and move safely around on a bike. But who in Sweden cannot climb on a cycle without a thought and toddle off? Well, among others immigrant women coming from Africa and the Middle East who find themselves living in this very different culture in which they are free to cycle like everyone else.

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Wednesday, January 26, 2011

Interview: Sharing is important on the World's Streets

On a cold gray Paris winter day Ms Lesley Brown, editor of Mobility magazine, came to World Streets to interview the editor about his noisily stated views on the importance of sharing in the future of the transport sector. Her article made it into the pages of Mobility on 20 January, which you can read in the original here or just below.

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Tuesday, January 25, 2011

Ridesharing Institute II. If you will, but Public Transport on the first line please

In yesterday's feature which was intended to inform the exchanges at this week's TRB session concerning the eventual creation of a continuing program to support and expand ridesharing as a central sustainable transport policy, the point is made that the project should concentrate whatever resources it can stump up on ridesharing, as opposed to traditional public transport which has its own institutional and support system (for better or worse) while ridesharing from a policy and institutional perspective is still an orphan. But Simon Norton begs to differ:

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Friday, January 21, 2011

Ridesharing Institute – Contribution to today's TRB discussions

Dear Paul, Susan, and other TRB friends having a look at this proposal this afternoon in DC. This is an excellent first-cut proposal and food for thought on a very important policy topic -- and I want to get firmly behind the basic concept right now.

I wish I could be with you for these important discussions because like at least half of you in this audience I am firmly convinced in the potential for ridesharing in its many diverse forms as a vital and critical means in the process of moving from unsustainable to sustainable transportation. [I am sure that much of what you find here is well known to most of you. But here I am at my desk in Paris and I want to share my best thoughts with you on this. So off we go.]

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Thursday, January 20, 2011

New tools: Assessing damage of the Queensland Flood - 2

In today from Gordon Price and Price Tags:
The Queensland Flood - 2Gladys We sends along a link to a remarkable set of dynamic before-and-after shots of the floods in Brisbane posted by ABC News, Australia's broadcaster. These aerials were taken in flyovers on January 13 and January 14 - and then matched up exactly. When loaded, you can use your mouse to hover over each photo, and move the line back and forth to view the devastation caused by flooding.

Click for full article from Price Tags and aerial maps from ABC News and

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Wednesday, January 19, 2011

Sustainable transport in Delhi and Stockholm

This article addresses from an Indo-Swedish perspective issues of the development of transport systems, taking its examples from Delhi and Stockholm. The introduction of the first BRT or bus rapid transport corridor in Delhi and the institution of a congestion tax in Stockholm are presented and discussed in terms of modernisation and sustainable transport. The authors explore the perceptions of politicians and examine the two projects in the search for the driving forces for transport policies. Despite all the differences, some similarities in the development of their urban transport projects have been found.

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Monday, January 17, 2011

Toward a sustainable Queensland - A crisis is a terrible thing to waste.

Dear Australian friends and colleagues,

We all know this old saw but this is a time and place where it is, I believe, truly worth thinking about. In this context I have three immediate questions for you:

1. Is it possible that the tragic events of the last weeks could now be turned into an opportunity to develop a new and far more sustainable pattern of mobility (and location) in Queensland?

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Friday, January 14, 2011

Reposting exceptional contributions to World Streets

World Streets has from the beginning been defined and run as an open collaborative venture. In addition to its considerable original content, the journal welcomes suggestions  concerning outstanding recent articles and reports appearing in other sources, which in their view our readers would do well to know more about.  After internal review  and selection, we occasionally get in touch with the author or publisher of the selected piece and ask for permission to reprint. All such articles follow the same routines for preparation and publication:

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Tuesday, January 11, 2011

Delhi Metro - A Transport Planner's Perspective

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Associate editor Faizan Jawed reports from Delhi:  At a time when the Delhi Government, politicos, media and the middle-class is raving about Metro Rail as a panacea to all traffic woes in Delhi (traffic congestion included), an objective assessment of its performance and appropriateness is highly warranted. Built at a cost that could provide free bus-based public transport and high quality non-motorized transport facilities for years, or feed millions of destitute malnourished Indian citizens, the Delhi Metro, now in operations since 2002, seems to not be living up to its promise. Ravi Gadepalli brings us a unique insight in to the planning and workings of the Delhi Metro. [* * * See Comments here.]

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Monday, January 10, 2011

"Carsharing will ease Shanghai's traffic problems"

We very much like this article that has just appeared in, in that it provides an example of how good new mobility ideas that have enjoyed a certain success in one place -- in this instance the long time carsharing project of the City of Bremen -- can start to make their way into other cities and parts of the world. Will this actually work out for Shanghai? Well at least it's a start.

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Friday, January 7, 2011

Guaranteed Scottish technique for taming traffic

As the whole world knows, the Scots are an ingenious lot.  And  in a highly creative response to my yesterday's "Unfair, unsafe and unwise . . . " call for collaborative ideas for car control, one anonymous Scottish expert has just sent in the following technical  illustration showing how they are able to slow down traffic and otherwise create a better smelling and more natural environment in Scotland.  He recommends it as an efficient, affordable, warm and often delicious sustainability strategy. It has worked for a long time in Scotland and will, they guarantee,  work well on your roads and streets too in the future. Auld Lang Syne.

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Thursday, January 6, 2011

Unfair, unsafe and unwise - a major crisis abuilding for sustainable transport in Britain

Dear British Friends and Colleagues,

Forgive me if I am being naïve, but based on what I am reading and hearing it strikes me that there is a major crisis abuilding for sustainable transport in Britain in the months immediately ahead -- as a result of the coalition government withdrawing funding from a lot of mainly small and local (since they really have to be small and usually local and focused if they are to succeed) sustainable transport initiatives This strikes me as a caring if distant observer as unfair, unsafe and unwise.

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Monday, January 3, 2011

World Transport Policy & Practice – Vol. 16, No. 3

The Journal of World Transport Policy and Practice is the long-standing  idea and print partner of World Streets and the New Mobility Agenda since 1995. The Winter 2011 edition appears today, and in the article that follows you will find the lead editorial by founding editor John Whitelegg. (For a more complete introduction to World Transport click here.)

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